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OS X Leopard

MetroMan

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Who's as excited as I am for Friday, October 26th?

Anybody and everybody should see this walk through... from Mac geeks to Windows users who thought that Vista was as good as it gets:



..OMG, I think I just soiled myself :eek:
 
I haven't been terribly impressed with the new features touted for Leopard. It seems like a very modest upgrade of Tiger. Apple and it's fans of course make it seem like the greatest upgrade in history.

I found this pretty funny:

Float Above Other Applications Watch a DVD while working in another application. Leopard DVD Player lets you keep your movie at the front of your desktop no matter what else you need to do

That feature has been available for years in Windows video players.
 
You may not be interested, but this is far from being a "modest" upgrade of Tiger.

A brand new Finder is alone worth the upgrade. The use of Cover Flow in Finder is brilliant. I'm going to be using that a lot.

Spaces is another huge addition to productivity and organization as is stacks in the Dock.

Time Machine finally makes backups brain dead simple with little to no intervention from the user.

Under the hood you'll find some extraordinary advances. Leopard is the first Apple OS to take full advantage of multiple core processors and 64bit.

Core animation is going to revolutionize the way developers make Mac applications. With the set of tools available with Core Animation, any developer can make beautiful apps that are consistent with what Apple designs themselves.

Then of course, there is Boot Camp, a Leopard feature (even though you've been able to use the Beta on Tiger) which allows a Mac to run Windows, definitively erasing the last remaining hurdle as to why people couldn't buy a Mac (i.e. their work required that they use Windows for corporate software).

Finally, i know I'm looking forward to new Mail features like data detector which recognizes data in emails such as addresses and appointments and allows you to easily add that data to your address book and your iCal.

I also can't wait for the Notes feature in Mail. How many times did I e-mail myself something so I wouldn't forget or simply to take down a note?

Leopard is a bigger leap over Tiger than Tiger was to Panther.

The downside is that I simply cannot see anything else that can improved with this OS. It's near Gawd Damn perfect.
 
After working on seriously backward Windows based PCs with major pipeline issues while in NYC, I couldn't wait to get back home (Chicago) for a few days and haul out my G4 with the latest software and loaded to the max hard drives. Now I'm in Toronto again, where my contracting firm, in its infinite wisdom, has replaced the MAC I used with a PC loaded with VISTA software - thoroughly depressing, but I'm now use to it.

I will drop by my favourite MAC store and get the spiel from one of their "Experts" on Leopard this weekend.
 
You may not be interested, but this is far from being a "modest" upgrade of Tiger.

A brand new Finder is alone worth the upgrade. The use of Cover Flow in Finder is brilliant. I'm going to be using that a lot.

Spaces is another huge addition to productivity and organization as is stacks in the Dock.

Time Machine finally makes backups brain dead simple with little to no intervention from the user.

Under the hood you'll find some extraordinary advances. Leopard is the first Apple OS to take full advantage of multiple core processors and 64bit.

Core animation is going to revolutionize the way developers make Mac applications. With the set of tools available with Core Animation, any developer can make beautiful apps that are consistent with what Apple designs themselves.

Then of course, there is Boot Camp, a Leopard feature (even though you've been able to use the Beta on Tiger) which allows a Mac to run Windows, definitively erasing the last remaining hurdle as to why people couldn't buy a Mac (i.e. their work required that they use Windows for corporate software).

Finally, i know I'm looking forward to new Mail features like data detector which recognizes data in emails such as addresses and appointments and allows you to easily add that data to your address book and your iCal.

I also can't wait for the Notes feature in Mail. How many times did I e-mail myself something so I wouldn't forget or simply to take down a note?

Leopard is a bigger leap over Tiger than Tiger was to Panther.

The downside is that I simply cannot see anything else that can improved with this OS. It's near Gawd Damn perfect.

I'm very interested. I just don't find a lot of these improvements to be particularly as impressive as Apple thinks they are. Automated backups could be found on XP and Vista (the latter with similar functionality to Time Machine). Cover Flow? Nice but not terribly impressed either. Safari is overrated. Quicktime is still garbage.

Don't get me wrong, it all looks nice and should be good. I'd hardly call any of these upgrades revolutionary though.
 
I will drop by my favourite MAC store and get the spiel from one of their "Experts" on Leopard this weekend.

Why bother? Aside from their sales pitch most of their "geniuses" have no idea what they're talking about.
 
"Then of course, there is Boot Camp, a Leopard feature (even though you've been able to use the Beta on Tiger) which allows a Mac to run Windows, definitively erasing the last remaining hurdle as to why people couldn't buy a Mac (i.e. their work required that they use Windows for corporate software)."

I can think of a good reason not to buy a Mac: horrible value for money, gimmicky hardware with expensive repairs and upgrades. Why the hell would you put notebook components in a desktop (all the cost and reliability of miniaturised components and the portability of a desktop)? Why integrate the CPU with the display (want to upgrade your display without forking out two grand?--fat chance)?

I won't even get into things such as how bad quicktime is...
 
"Then of course, there is Boot Camp, a Leopard feature (even though you've been able to use the Beta on Tiger) which allows a Mac to run Windows, definitively erasing the last remaining hurdle as to why people couldn't buy a Mac (i.e. their work required that they use Windows for corporate software)."

I can think of a good reason not to buy a Mac: horrible value for money, gimmicky hardware with expensive repairs and upgrades. Why the hell would you put notebook components in a desktop (all the cost and reliability of miniaturised components and the portability of a desktop)? Why integrate the CPU with the display (want to upgrade your display without forking out two grand?--fat chance)?

I won't even get into things such as how bad quicktime is...

The value for the money is a huge issue. Now that they use standard components (although according to the geniuses they're "special") you can really see how overpriced some of the hardware is...although it has become more competitive.

I don't like the side loading DVD drive. In a tight spot that's a real hassle.
 
"Then of course, there is Boot Camp, a Leopard feature (even though you've been able to use the Beta on Tiger) which allows a Mac to run Windows, definitively erasing the last remaining hurdle as to why people couldn't buy a Mac (i.e. their work required that they use Windows for corporate software)."

I can think of a good reason not to buy a Mac: horrible value for money, gimmicky hardware with expensive repairs and upgrades. Why the hell would you put notebook components in a desktop (all the cost and reliability of miniaturised components and the portability of a desktop)? Why integrate the CPU with the display (want to upgrade your display without forking out two grand?--fat chance)?

I won't even get into things such as how bad quicktime is...

When you've gone through three PCs in three years, countless reinstalls of windows due to it crashing, and above all that being forced to use vista (which I can stand maybe three minutes of before I start pulling my hair out), you'll start to see the world very differently.
 
I am actually quite excited about Leopard..... although on it's surface it looks like a small upgrade to some -- there has actually been a lot of development effort to implement those changes (IMHO). There are a number of features that I really look forward to trying out.

Actually, I only recently bought my first mac, I am quite happy with it. Vista was the last straw for me -- I was horrified at how bad of a release it was (after 6 years) -- it reminds me of DOS 4 release....

I look forward to the next release following this (for the server side) -- with the full implementation of ZFS (likely) for the file system.
 
I can think of a good reason not to buy a Mac: horrible value for money, gimmicky hardware with expensive repairs and upgrades. Why the hell would you put notebook components in a desktop (all the cost and reliability of miniaturised components and the portability of a desktop)? Why integrate the CPU with the display (want to upgrade your display without forking out two grand?--fat chance)?


Funny, but that has not been my experience at all. My Mac has been trouble-free for over four years - in terms of hardware and software. It runs seven days a week. The operating system is stable, the multimedia features are great, and the software is high quality. That's not to say that all Mac's are always trouble free; no technology ever is.

Recently, I created a nice range of documents for a multi-million dollar proposal - all on Pages. The people I did this for will never know that their project was generated on a software package that was less than a hundred bucks. It was very easy to learn, simple to use, much more flexible than I had thought it would be, and opens in other applications.

If you like something, stick with it.
 
When you've gone through three PCs in three years, countless reinstalls of windows due to it crashing, and above all that being forced to use vista (which I can stand maybe three minutes of before I start pulling my hair out), you'll start to see the world very differently.

No, I doubt it. I can't see myself moving from linux (free, flexible, affordable hardware) to Mac. If you like gimmicky hardware, all the power to you. On the other hand, I'm the kind of person who, when they first sit down in front of some bubbly, shiny, fade-in/-out OS is turn most of that crap off.

For me, linux when possible and XP when necessary is fine.
 

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