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Mayor John Tory's Toronto

afransen

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At just over half a percentage point of the annual budget (I'm assuming approximately 10 billion) that's essentially a rounding error. Much ado about nothing.
That's actually 10x too much. That would make it 6 basis points, or 0.06%.
 

DSC

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As they and most municipalities have done for many years the interim tax bill is 50% of the total tax assessed in the previous year. "As property tax is a large obligation relative to other (non-financing) home ownership costs, cities typically want to ensure residents have enough time. However, budgets for the year (and subsequently, tax rates) are not typically financed until the end of the first quarter of the year. Because of this, the city usually issues two bills: an interim bill and a final bill.

The Interim Tax Bill estimates the taxes for the year and issues a bill for half the amount. Later in the Year (usually by May), the municipality sends the final tax bill, approximately equal to the interim bill, plus or minus the adjustment difference between the estimate and the actual tax rates for the year." See" https://catalystre.ca/toronto-property-tax-info/

The interim bill really has no relationship with the final bill we will all get in May as it does not take into acount any changes in the MPAC valuation or the tax rate for the current year.
Here is the official City PR:

February 3, 2023

City of Toronto issues 2023 interim property tax bills, introduces eBilling option

The City of Toronto has issued 2023 interim property tax bills – the first of two tax bills mailed each year. New this year, residents can register for the City's new electronic billing (eBilling) option and register to receive email notifications of their property tax bills.

Payment due dates for the interim tax bill under the three-instalment plan are March 1, April 3 and May 1. The 2023 final tax bill will be mailed in May.

For property owners enrolled in the Pre-authorized Tax Payment program, the 2023 interim tax due dates are:

• Two-instalment plan: March 1

• Six-instalment plan: March 1, April 3 and May 1

• 11-instalment plan: February 15, March 15, April 17, May 15 and June 15

The City's recommended 2023 Budget property tax increases will be considered at a special meeting of City Council on Tuesday, February 14. The final 2023 property tax bill will be mailed in May and will include the final instalment payment dates.
 

Jonny5

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Can confirm from above I see streetcars once again passing through the King/University intersection and an occasional car too, but very few as I think almost everyone chose to work from home today for temperature reasons. It's deserted in most of downtown right now.
 

zang

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The basement boiler should be the main source of heat. However each apartment should have its own ductless heat pump. The ductless heat pump could supplement the needed heat for the comfort of the people in the apartment, but also be able to become the air conditioner in summer.

So we apparently have a system like that in our building. It's not exactly ideal. Rising heat from the many floors below us in this huge concrete block means that we have to keep the thermostat off and the windows partially open all season long in order to maintain a comfortable temperature during the winter. The rules about keeping the heat available until June 1st is a major problem when we generally get our first heat wave in mid-May, and ambient temperatures are already going above room temperature daily by the end of April. The landlord having control of whether it's heat or AC means they want to keep the AC off as long as possible, and we have to fight with them to get it switched to cold somewhere in the first week of May. Unless enough tenants complain, they'll usually just shrug it off and hand wave some excuse. The windows are "high-efficiency" ones that don't open very much to catch even the smallest breeze. Combined with the stored heat in the mass of concrete and rising from the other units means there are springs where I've measured (infrared themometer on multiple spots on the walls) ambient temperature our apartment at 30°C inside. So many of the tenants have fans running spring and fall, which seems to negate the energy efficiency of such systems.
 

W. K. Lis

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So we apparently have a system like that in our building. It's not exactly ideal. Rising heat from the many floors below us in this huge concrete block means that we have to keep the thermostat off and the windows partially open all season long in order to maintain a comfortable temperature during the winter. The rules about keeping the heat available until June 1st is a major problem when we generally get our first heat wave in mid-May, and ambient temperatures are already going above room temperature daily by the end of April. The landlord having control of whether it's heat or AC means they want to keep the AC off as long as possible, and we have to fight with them to get it switched to cold somewhere in the first week of May. Unless enough tenants complain, they'll usually just shrug it off and hand wave some excuse. The windows are "high-efficiency" ones that don't open very much to catch even the smallest breeze. Combined with the stored heat in the mass of concrete and rising from the other units means there are springs where I've measured (infrared themometer on multiple spots on the walls) ambient temperature our apartment at 30°C inside. So many of the tenants have fans running spring and fall, which seems to negate the energy efficiency of such systems.
Likely because they require the heat to be at 21°C or else. If they set the minimum to 20°C during the day and 18°C at bedtime, then they can let let the occupants raise the temperature above 20°C or 18°C using the heat pump... at the tenant's expense (if the heat pump is on the tenant's electric meter).
 

zang

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Likely because they require the heat to be at 21°C or else. If they set the minimum to 20°C during the day and 18°C at bedtime, then they can let let the occupants raise the temperature above 20°C or 18°C using the heat pump... at the tenant's expense (if the heat pump is on the tenant's electric meter).
The building turns the heat off around April, and only turn it on (like the AC) if someone complains. So sometimes we'll have heat accessible during this lull time if there's a cold snap, but only if (generally) a senior on the lower floors requests it. Then the heat gets shut off the next time it goes back to regular temperatures outside. But from my exploration, no one above about the 5th floor even bothers having their thermostat turned on during these times.

Meanwhile, the Ground Floor/Office's AC (which is completely independent), is turned on as soon as it's needed.

The system sounds good in theory, but its usage is just as prone to abuse as others.
 

PinkLucy

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The Fords used to be great at the Friday afternoon bombshell. Following in their footsteps really isn’t a great idea.
 

Jonny5

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LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL!!!!!!


EDIT: Not to make light of this. Clear example of the power imbalance that can induce some to do things they absolutely should never do, or be convinced to do them.
 
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