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Lost Road: Indian Line Road

Hey all. Thanks for the sweet memories, though you don't know me I was touched by your thread. Funny that I came across this when I was hoping to track my old home which was on Indan Line! I see these posts are old but thought I would write. I used to live on a farm on Indian Line, I guess north of where Morningstar Drive would be (if it reached Indian Line at the time). I lived on the farm at Humber River Eqestrians and next door there was another family home, then the Circle C Ranch. I used to swim with my horse in the river. If anyone reads this, I wonder if I might ask: could I possibly find the land my old home stood on, or even get near that part of the river which was south of the dam? I spent a lot of time walking Indian Line as a kid both ways, towards 50, Steeles and the other way back towards Malton. Thanks for the memories in any case.

Hi, Alma. :) Did you happen to see the photos that compare aerial shots of the area on the first page of the thread? That might give you some access point to work from.

Did you live on the Peel side or the Metro side of Indian Line? I think stuff in Mississauga would be reasonably accessible... except it's all streets and homes now... but the Toronto side strikes me as a lot harder. A lot of that area's tied up in the the 427, its interchange with Finch, and the industrial park. Of the three farms I can see in the 1959 view, the northernmost one looks like it was put out of business and partly swallowed up by the reservoir (though you can still access that land between the water on the remnants of Indian Line; it's open fields with trees now), the one in the middle would now be in the southwest end of the industrial park; and the one in the south directly opposite the campgrounds is now smack-dab in the middle of the 427 interchange at Finch Avenue.

It might be possible to stroll along the river by now. I think there are trails that will take you at least as far as part of the way between Finch and the 427. If they extend to the reservoir yet, I don't know.

You might be able to help us with a related question, if you lived in the area. Some of us have been trying to figure out if Humberline Drive, just to the east of Indian Line Road, ever actually crossed the Humber River. There are hints that it made an approach to the river on both the north and south, but I've never found any evidence there was actually a bridge there anytime since they started publishing aerial shots (1947). Wondering if you might have anything to add, one way or the other. :)
 
Hi, Alma. :) Did you happen to see the photos that compare aerial shots of the area on the first page of the thread? That might give you some access point to work from.

Hi Lone Primate, Great to see your response just now and thank you for your help. I'm afraid my sense of direction is not great (clearly!) : ) I did look at the photos and they are excellent but I couldn't imagine it well enough to locate the farm. When we moved to the farm I had to change schools (to rexdale) so yes, I was on the Metro side but really nearly in Malton. I walk down the back of Humber College semi-regularly heading around the loop (a great walk btw) but hope next time to make a point and with time to head west-ish. I might be able to sort the direction out better once we try a walk through.

Did you live on the Peel side or the Metro side of Indian Line? I think stuff in Mississauga would be reasonably accessible... except it's all streets and homes now... but the Toronto side strikes me as a lot harder.

Did they reroute the river I wonder ...

A lot of that area's tied up in the the 427, its interchange with Finch, and the industrial park. Of the three farms I can see in the 1959 view, the northernmost one looks like it was put out of business and partly swallowed up by the reservoir (though you can still access that land between the water on the remnants of Indian Line; it's open fields with trees now), the one in the middle would now be in the southwest end of the industrial park; and the one in the south directly opposite the campgrounds is now smack-dab in the middle of the 427 interchange at Finch Avenue.

I need to go back and take a proper look at that now you've described the one with the farms; at the time in the late 60s early 70s the aerial view ought to show a house with three barns and then a few hundred feet a more modern family home (I don't know when it was built) then the same distance again 'till Circle C Ranch which sat on top of the most steep incline down to the river. I think that was all the building on that side and stretch of Indian Line during my time there.

It might be possible to stroll along the river by now. I think there are trails that will take you at least as far as part of the way between Finch and the 427. If they extend to the reservoir yet, I don't know.

I'll post once I've had a chance to walk that route by the river, I'm looking forward to it.

You might be able to help us with a related question, if you lived in the area. Some of us have been trying to figure out if Humberline Drive, just to the east of Indian Line Road, ever actually crossed the Humber River. There are hints that it made an approach to the river on both the north and south, but I've never found any evidence there was actually a bridge there anytime since they started publishing aerial shots (1947). Wondering if you might have anything to add, one way or the other. :)

I'm not sure if this is helpful and can't now really picture where Humberline was at the time (the existing road is called Humberline) but we rode our horses all around that area, so from the farm riding across the river at shallow area headed southerly just and then east (I think) and I believe the first bridge we rode under was at 27 (that area where the walking trail is today). But I'm really not sure, but interested. I have some photos of the area and looking forward to seeing what shows in the background. My nieghbours might have clearer recollections. I want to apologise in advance for poor skills following threads and hope this makes sense once it's sent.
 
I'm thinking of going for a stroll here.

There's no traffic other than possible service vehicles, right?

And they shouldn't have a problem with someone going for a walk?
 
I'm thinking of going for a stroll here.

There's no traffic other than possible service vehicles, right?

And they shouldn't have a problem with someone going for a walk?

On Indian Line? No... the property on the west side of it is actually part of Claireville Conservation Area. Stuff on the east is industrial park; it's a sea of pavement and there's not much to see there anyway. Go nuts. The walk across the dam is nice. There's a little strip mall on Albion just southeast of where the Indian Line-Albion Road intersection used to be... or, if you're not comfortable poaching a spot, you can park just north up on Codlin Crescent, which has the dual distinction of being formed of both Old Albion Road and Old Steeles Avenue.

No traffic but the occasional service vehicle for about twenty years now.
 
After walking that part of the Humber River

Hi, Alma. :) Did you happen to see the photos that compare aerial shots of the area on the first page of the thread? That might give you some access point to work from.

Did you live on the Peel side or the Metro side of Indian Line? I think stuff in Mississauga would be reasonably accessible... except it's all streets and homes now... but the Toronto side strikes me as a lot harder. A lot of that area's tied up in the the 427, its interchange with Finch, and the industrial park. Of the three farms I can see in the 1959 view, the northernmost one looks like it was put out of business and partly swallowed up by the reservoir (though you can still access that land between the water on the remnants of Indian Line; it's open fields with trees now), the one in the middle would now be in the southwest end of the industrial park; and the one in the south directly opposite the campgrounds is now smack-dab in the middle of the 427 interchange at Finch Avenue.

It might be possible to stroll along the river by now. I think there are trails that will take you at least as far as part of the way between Finch and the 427. If they extend to the reservoir yet, I don't know.

You might be able to help us with a related question, if you lived in the area. Some of us have been trying to figure out if Humberline Drive, just to the east of Indian Line Road, ever actually crossed the Humber River. There are hints that it made an approach to the river on both the north and south, but I've never found any evidence there was actually a bridge there anytime since they started publishing aerial shots (1947). Wondering if you might have anything to add, one way or the other. :)

Please excuse my inelegant attempts at responding again to your original post lone primate : ) I took more time to look at 1959 and 1965 photos and do see the farm where I lived at the very bottom right side ... I also saw one of the vies in larger size on google (I think you posted them?) and can there also see the three homesteads! Very exciting for me, thank you. I walked some of the Humber on the weekend and now on a mission to try to locate the exact spot of Humber Valley Equestrians where I lived. It's hard to tell now but there was a large clearing at the bottom of the steep incline to the river from Circle C Ranch and I did see a similar space on the walk this weekend.

I believe I spoke hastily in my original reply and shortly after writing I had a vague recollection of another bridge/structure between Indian LIne and highway 427, but as I said, it's vague. There are people who likely remember clearly, other riders from the two horse farms. I was young and not that interested at the time but do recall a structure that was not on our trail, and off to the side of where we rode. I believe that it was unfinished and rust-coloured. I also believe there was a smaller older, bridge across the Humber but quite a short ride from the farm.
 
On Indian Line? No... the property on the west side of it is actually part of Claireville Conservation Area. Stuff on the east is industrial park; it's a sea of pavement and there's not much to see there anyway.

Except the BAPS temple, of course

DSCN3806_resize.JPG
 
...Codlin Crescent, which has the dual distinction of being formed of both Old Albion Road and Old Steeles Avenue.

Your 'lost roads/bridges/neighbourhoods' threads are an endless fascination for me.

I did a Google streetview 'walk' of Codlin. Fascinating how there are old farmhouses here and there along its length.
 
Except the BAPS temple, of course

DSCN3806_resize.JPG

Yes, alas, built over the wide curve the road took for a while. I wish I'd been aware of all this before the construction erased its remnants. Still, there are far less elegant things that might have taken its place, that's for sure. :)
 
Your 'lost roads/bridges/neighbourhoods' threads are an endless fascination for me.

I did a Google streetview 'walk' of Codlin. Fascinating how there are old farmhouses here and there along its length.

Well thank you. :) I ought to get back to that. One thing I've been dying to see is the original bridge over the Humber where Finch used to T-junction with Islington. I can find all kinds of shots of the pony truss that used to carry Islington over the West Humber further south, but not a single one of the bridge up by Finch. Anyone ever seen anything like that?
 

Thank you for sending the link to your story about Claireville. Strange now thinking back and realizing that the odd link between all of those roads lead there at one time and now many people hardly notice or know. I don't recall Watson's farm, likely I knew it by another name (need to look that up).
I thought I'd send the link to the pdf of the trail along that part of the Humber, you likely know but the map is interesting to see and it's still a beautiful walk,
http://www.toronto.ca/parks/pdf/trails/wHumberDW-692.pdf Park at the Humberwood Community Centre, here's the link http://www.ontariovolleyball.org/in...02-humberwood-community-centre-etobicoke.html
 
Someone posted a video, shot over 20 years ago, that unbelievably include not only that very intersection on the 427... but actually having to stop at it! What a treasure. Let me see if I can manage to post it.

[video=youtube;SuYmw4v2rxg]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuYmw4v2rxg[/video]
 

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