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Western Waterfront Master Plan

AlvinofDiaspar

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From City of Toronto News:

November 15, 2007
planningAlliance [pA] wins bid to develop western waterfront master plan

The City of Toronto is pleased to announce that planningAlliance [pA] is the winning vendor of the request for proposals (RFP) to develop a western waterfront master plan in consultation with the community. A comprehensive civic engagement strategy will guide decision-making throughout the master planning process. A public open house and study commencement is scheduled for Monday, November 26, 2007 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W., Committee Room 2, second floor.

“Our team looks forward to improving an area that has long occupied an important position in the history of Toronto - first as a transportation route for First Nations peoples, then as the western edge of a growing community, and now as one of the City’s great public green spaces,†said planningAlliance partner John van Nostrand.

“This is a tremendous opportunity to connect communities to Toronto’s waterfront in an area with some of the city’s finest lake views and public realm,†said Councillor Bill Saundercook, Ward 13 Parkdale-High Park.

“Torontonians who live near the western waterfront have big dreams for the area,†said Councillor Gord Perks, Ward 14 Parkdale-High Park. “This study will help give those dreams shape.â€

At its September 2006 meeting City Council approved a report authorizing a study of the western waterfront area. This area is bounded by the Humber River to the west, Marilyn Bell Park to the east, Lake Ontario to the south and the Lake Shore Blvd. W./Gardiner Expressway/Queensway corridor to the north. The master plan, expected in late 2008, will make recommendations on public realm improvements in the area (which is primarily zoned parkland) including the type and location of parks facilities and complementary transportation and transit networks, including cycling and pedestrian facilities.

Founded in 1999, planningAlliance [pA] and its affiliate architectsAlliance [aA] comprise a staff of 70 urban and environmental planners, urban designers, architects and engineers. They support a broad scope of practice, including the preparation of master plans; design guidelines for socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable urban development; and, architectural design and construction management. pA’s work includes a development framework for the western beaches, a landscape Master Plan for the Ashbridges Bay Treatment Plant and the Eastern Portlands Secondary Plan.

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and sixth largest government, and home to a diverse population of about 2.6 million people. It is the economic engine of Canada and one of the greenest and most creative cities in North America. In the past three years, Toronto has won more than 70 awards for quality, innovation and efficiency in delivering public services. Toronto’s government is dedicated to prosperity, opportunity and liveability for all its residents.


Media Contacts:

Councillor Gord Perks, Ward 14, Parkdale-High Park, 416-392-7919, councilor_perks@toronto.ca Councillor Bill Saundercook, Ward 13, Parkdale-High Park, 416-392-4072, [councilor_saundercook@toronto.ca
Elaine Baxter-Trahair, Director, Waterfront Secretariat, 416-397-4816, ebaxter@toronto.ca

For more information about the public meeting, contact:

Graeme Burt, planningAlliance, at 416-593-6499 or gburt@planningalliance.ca

http://www.toronto.ca/pdf/media_release/western_waterfront_plan_map.pdf

AoD
 
Waterfront Toronto

It is my opinion that the city of Toronto should have handed this project or did it jointly with Waterfront Toronto.

If we are to create any sort of planning and design consistency along our waterfront there should be greater communication and coordination between the two bodies.

Louroz
 
I've always been a big plan of the Parkdale deck plan that Miller pushed when he was a councillor. I was looking at the plans the other day at the urban affairs library, and they basically involve building over the Gardiner from about Dufferin to Jameson and extending Parkdale down to the water. I think that would be an absolutely fantastic idea, and I'd love to see that as part of this plan. In 1989, they put the cost at $20 million for the decking. That's about the same as the Dufferin railway underpass. Even at double that cost it's about the best city building project for the money that I can imagine.
 
Those were really interesting plans, and I would love to see them resurrected. It would integrate the CNE grounds better with the city as well, especially from the north/west. It would be the perfect opportunity to build a mixed-income, mid-rise community on land the city already owns, and would certainly boost the West Waterfront LRT.

It would once again link Parkdale with the lake.
 
It is my opinion that the city of Toronto should have handed this project or did it jointly with Waterfront Toronto.

Miller's been over-meddling with the TWRC and the Waterfront since he got it power. I stopped voting for him as a result. Now with his (I've lost count of how many times) fare hike and property transfer tax (which I find cowardly and not targeted at those who benefit from the services being paid for) I can't see ever voting for him no matter what he does.
 
At the risk of being glib, I see little point in studying this area at all unless decking the Gardiner and rail corridor (to reconnect Parkdale) IS the reason for the study.

It is some what ironic that the CNE is not "connected" to this study area. It should be looked at in context of this footprint. Remember the phantom deck idea between the CNE and the lake (over Lakeshore Blvd).

Everything from the Humber to Fort York is clearly an issue about (lack of) connections.

Maybe it's time to do a doodle for this part of the Lakeshore/Gardiner/rail corridor..... hmmn.
 
I've always been a big plan of the Parkdale deck plan that Miller pushed when he was a councillor. I was looking at the plans the other day at the urban affairs library, and they basically involve building over the Gardiner from about Dufferin to Jameson and extending Parkdale down to the water. I think that would be an absolutely fantastic idea, and I'd love to see that as part of this plan. In 1989, they put the cost at $20 million for the decking. That's about the same as the Dufferin railway underpass. Even at double that cost it's about the best city building project for the money that I can imagine.

Where is the urban affairs library?
 
This will be a real challenge for these pA guys; I hope they're up to it. There is so much wasted space and so much potential. It hurts my brain that there is a rail corridor, 2 ROW lanes and around 14 lanes of traffic between St. Michaels and the beach. Arggg!
 
Remember

This was brought about because of the parking lot Palais Royale was allowed to build in the median of Lakeshore.

The neighbourhood was not overly impressed with the then Councillor Watson.

The push was on to make sure there was a 'plan', primarily to avoid more 'surprises.
 
I'm skeptical about this past proposal to deck over this section of the city. I would have to see the plans myself to see what was being proposed, however it already doesn't sound all that appealing to me.

I absolutely agree there needs to be greater and improved connections between Parkdale and the lake. However, I believe this is one of the most spectaular gateways into Toronto.

By car, GO Train or the Waterfront Trail to see downtown Toronto and the Wind Turnbine rising ahead of you, mature trees and lake Ontario to the south and these tastefully done corporate ads done enitrely of green landscaping with Parkdale and streetcars running just above them has always gave me an impressive welcome into the city. I would hate to lose that view.

Louroz
 
yeah... it would be a shame to lose that view even if it reconnected an entire neighbourhood to the lake that it used to live beside.

The great thing about the view is sometimes you get to see it for up to 45 minutes when there's a traffic accident, lane closure or other delay.

... actually there is no view in the key Sunnyside portion of the study area.
 
yeah... it would be a shame to lose that view even if it reconnected an entire neighbourhood to the lake that it used to live beside.

The great thing about the view is sometimes you get to see it for up to 45 minutes when there's a traffic accident, lane closure or other delay

Love the sarcasm.

As someone who loves Parkdale and almost took a job as Project Coordinator with the Parkdale-Liberty Economic Development Corporation, sits on the Board of the Canadian National Exhibition, a vocal opponent to the Palais Royale parking lot and an almost daily user of this corridor I'm going to reiterate my skepticism to the past proposal; however I’m going to make it a point to do research on the proposal at the Urban Affairs Library when I have time one day.

Louroz
 
The section being decked over is from about Dowling to Dunn. It's only three blocks, and it doesn't involve the area with the attractive plant ads (which would likely be obliterated by the Waterfront West LRT). I don't see why they couldn't extend it east to Dufferin, too, since the Gardiner just runs in a concrete-lined trench at that point.
 

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