Toronto Sugar Wharf Condominiums (Phase 1) | 231m | 70s | Menkes | a—A

January 18, 2023:

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Thanks @C-mac for noticing!
 
These things really stand out when you're driving south on DVP. You can see this big cluster of buildings, then a gap, and these two babies just off to the east. Phase 2 will fill that gap nicely.
One of my favourite views on my drive into work/into the city! Nothing like seeing the skyline pop out of the trees and valley edges.
 
These things really stand out when you're driving south on DVP. You can see this big cluster of buildings, then a gap, and these two babies just off to the east. Phase 2 will fill that gap nicely.
I haven't driven that route in the last couple of years. Is One Yonge also nicely visible?
 
Though I do not think this has gone through TEYCC yet (or been noted here), the City's map for ToInView shows the name of the new street just east of SW #1.

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Tinsley is, for Heritage Toronto plaque, described as:

John Tinsley (1782-1892) was born a free Black man in Richmond, Virginia. He trained as a carpenter and millwright and came to Canada in 1842. In Toronto, Tinsley was a building contractor and he ran a successful construction company. Tinsley would often hire and provide vital paid work to newcomers to Canada who arrived via the Underground Railroad, the secret network of travel routes that allowed enslaved people to find comparative freedom in the northern United States and Canada. He was a prominent member of Toronto’s Black community. He was an active member of the First Baptist Church, located at Queen and Victoria Streets. The church was the first Baptist congregation in Toronto and one of the oldest Black institutions in the city. Many people connected to the Underground Railroad and abolitionist movement were members of the church. Tinsley worked into his 90s and died in Toronto at his home on Agnes Street (now part of Dundas Street). He is buried in Toronto’s Necropolis.
 
Fascinating historical note about John Tinsley. I wonder about the dates of his birth and death, however. 1782-1892? It’s not impossible but a lifespan of 110 would definitely be highly unusual. I wonder if they meant 1792-1882. That would be lengthy span in the 19th century in itself. That would bring him to Canada at age 50, which also seems somewhat more likely.
 
Fascinating historical note about John Tinsley. I wonder about the dates of his birth and death, however. 1782-1892? It’s not impossible but a lifespan of 110 would definitely be highly unusual. I wonder if they meant 1792-1882. That would be lengthy span in the 19th century in itself. That would bring him to Canada at age 50, which also seems somewhat more likely.
I agree it seems unlikely but the Find-a-Grave website notes:

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