News   Jun 14, 2024
 2.4K     1 
News   Jun 14, 2024
 1.7K     1 
News   Jun 14, 2024
 850     0 

Toronto as Global Financial Centre

Interesting move out today as TD terminated its 13B+ purchase of U.S. regional bank First Horizon.


While this will slow TD's U.S. expansion and comes with a $200M break-fee for walking away from the deal; its not a surprise or a bad move.

The recent turmoil in U.S. regional banks has caused their stock prices to sink. First Horizon is now worth 1/3 less than what TD agreed to pay for it.

(~ $16USD per share vs $25)

I expect (but don't know) that TD tried to re-open the deal and get a lower price in light of the changed market conditions, but couldn't come to a new deal.

In that context, walking away makes sense.

It wouldn't surprise me to see TD take another run at it though at a much lower price point.

The stock was down up to 50% more (from the lower level) in pre-market trading.
 
Thoughts on the banking crisis south of the border? Hopefully it won't spread here.
 
The only impact will be seen in knock on effects in a US sub for the 4 that have a meaningful presence there...some deposit flight (to the largest US banks), some unrealized losses being recognized (commercial real estate the likely candidate) and increased regulatory costs (the regulators are rightly taking a fair amount of the blame here and can not let themselves be open to accusations again - so will over rotate).
 
Also - in any discussion on Toronto as a financial centre - one really should not overtly focus on the Banks but also consider the very large LifeCo's, Canada's somewhat uniquely large and dynamic public pension funds and Brookfield AM. At the end of the day - what makes you global is that it is more than just a nationally focused system - unfortunately, there is not much reason for US, European or Asian capital (providers of capital or users of capital) to seek out Toronto from a size of market, regulatory regime or any other driver.
 
- unfortunately, there is not much reason for US, European or Asian capital (providers of capital or users of capital) to seek out Toronto from a size of market, regulatory regime or any other driver.

I'm going to have to differ here on a couple of points.

Canada's banks are leaders in financing mining globally, they're big players in the sector.

The other thing I would note is that there are a number of U.S. banks with very significant back office operations in Toronto. The pool of talent is huge, the linguistic diversity best in class, and all at less than .80c on the dollar vs paying those staff in NYC. (less than because there is both an exchange rate issue and higher typical rate of comparable pay). The ability to shift global staff in/out of Toronto w/ease is also notable.
 
I'm going to have to differ here on a couple of points.

Canada's banks are leaders in financing mining globally, they're big players in the sector.

The other thing I would note is that there are a number of U.S. banks with very significant back office operations in Toronto. The pool of talent is huge, the linguistic diversity best in class, and all at less than .80c on the dollar vs paying those staff in NYC. (less than because there is both an exchange rate issue and higher typical rate of comparable pay). The ability to shift global staff in/out of Toronto w/ease is also notable.
take your point on raising capital for mining (Toronto and London would be the leaders) - but that is a pretty small sector of the global economy (and not buzzy, high growth one like say technology). Also agree we have great talent at 70% the cost - but I dont think we have a lot of global players meaningfully outsourcing operations to Toronto that I am aware of. They could do it in India or wherever for 10% the cost. I do think our talent pool, and maybe more significantly our immigration laws are a differentiator in the Tech space (at least in the Trump years) -but in Banking I have not really come across it in any scale.
 
Implications for the possible future office buildings proposed downtown- perhaps we may see some put on the backburner or converted to residential? Same goes for the older, smaller footage office stock downtown- primed for conversion or redevelopment?


 
Implications for the possible future office buildings proposed downtown- perhaps we may see some put on the backburner or converted to residential? Same goes for the older, smaller footage office stock downtown- primed for conversion or redevelopment?



I disagree w/the extent of Altus' prediction....... however......

Yes, most major conventional new projects will be deferred. Very few will be considered as residential sites, though one could never rule that out.

I do need expect to see, some Class B and Class C buildings (extant) converted to residential.
 

Back
Top