News   Jul 19, 2024
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Rollerblading Laws

MTown said:
Um.....lol?

Rollerblades and skateboard wheels scratch floors. I see.
Would that be because they're made of steel wool or finely-crushed gravel?

Are you approaching 90 by any chance?

Coruscanti Cognoscente said:
I agree with you. Streets are not safe. If I am biking, I'll take the sidewalk. If I was to rollerblade, I'd do the same. Better my life over some pedestrian's convenience.

Really? Are you both serious?

Firstly, rollerblading is an optional recreational activity. It's up to you to do it in a place where it is safe and legal, and do you really think that a pedestrian's right not to be injured is a mere "convenience"? Rollerblading is a fairly dangerous activity, especially since many people choose to rollerblade around others when they clearly haven't figured out the basics of stopping and/or not crashing into everything in sight. It's fine if you wish to assume that risk to yourself, but it is not right to pass that risk on to others. Bikes and rollerblades move much faster than pedestrians, are not expected on the sidewalk or indoors and can lead to serious collisions. I think that's pretty obvious. Also, if you feel you can't rollerblade or bike on the road because it's too dangerous, how hypocritical is it to then move to the sidewalk and inflict the exact same thing to pedestrians? Geez.

Secondly, rollerblades can in fact damage floors and interiors. Our condo has always had a no rollerblades or bikes rule in the lobby, but residents with either are welcome to come through the parking garage entrance. Our condo board is in the midst of spending $750,000 to refurbish the lobby, mainly because the marble floors are worn through and other details such as trim and mirroring is damaged. I think it's perfectly reasonable to think that having dozens of people hobbling and crashing through the lobby on rollerblades and bikes every day might hasten the wear-and-tear on the building, which all residents then pay to repair. Again, why should others have to risk damage or injury to accommodate the hobbies of a few?

There's nothing wrong with rollerblading, but be an adult and do it where you're supposed to, and where it doesn't bother others. It's not that difficult of a concept, really. If people used common sense like that we wouldn't need to post silly rules everywhere, but apparently we do.
 
You're right.

Don't forget to suggest that people take their shoes off before entering the lobby. Wouldn't want to scuff the floors, now would we?
 
It's up to you to do it in a place where it is safe and legal, and do you really think that a pedestrian's right not to be injured is a mere "convenience"?

rollerblading on the sidewalk is completely legal. So is biking in some cases. IE You are biking with a child.

Secondly, rollerblades can in fact damage floors and interiors. Our condo has always had a no rollerblades or bikes rule in the lobby, but residents with either are welcome to come through the parking garage entrance.

So Plastic and Rubber can destroy marble? Wtf... Are we in Bizarro world now? There is no part of a rollerblade that upon falling can damage a floor in that way without a sever wipeout. Are you having 10-20 wipeouts a day? Are bikes riding through the lobby at high velocity and crashing into walls?

I'd bet money on deliveries being far more damaging than the above. Dollies have hard metal edges, easily tip and can definitely chip marble. Maybe you should ban deliveries.
 
rollerblading on the sidewalk is completely legal. So is biking in some cases. IE You are biking with a child.

So Plastic and Rubber can destroy marble? Wtf... Are we in Bizarro world now? There is no part of a rollerblade that upon falling can damage a floor in that way without a sever wipeout. Are you having 10-20 wipeouts a day? Are bikes riding through the lobby at high velocity and crashing into walls?

I'd bet money on deliveries being far more damaging than the above. Dollies have hard metal edges, easily tip and can definitely chip marble. Maybe you should ban deliveries.

Have you checked whether rollerblading on sidewalks is "completely" legal? As for cycling, you are not supposed to be cycling on a sidewalk. And if you do, you absolutely must recognize that pedestrians always have the right of way.

Why is it so fucking difficult for some people to understand that others may not want rollerblading through the interior of a building?
 
No, I wasn't speaking to that. You went off and brought up how skateboard wheels damage flooring which I thought was laughable at best.
????

If the floors are waxed, any wheel of pretty much any material with a very heavy weight (i.e. not a stroller ...) applied can scrape off a bit of wax, leaving a mark, that will be there until the next waxing many months later. Shoes won't do this - they might scuff the floor a bit, but it won't remove the wax.

Your knowlege level here is laughable at best!

Beside, surely the major reason is liability. If the building owner was to let people rollerblade through corridors, and they were to injure someone, the owner could be liable for $millions. Is this not pretty obvious?
 
I'd bet money on deliveries being far more damaging than the above. Dollies have hard metal edges, easily tip and can definitely chip marble. Maybe you should ban deliveries.


Have you ever seen, or heard of something called a "loading dock"?
 
Have you checked whether rollerblading on sidewalks is "completely" legal? As for cycling, you are not supposed to be cycling on a sidewalk. And if you do, you absolutely must recognize that pedestrians always have the right of way.

Cycling is legal if the wheels are under a certain diameter. Since the law is applied based on size of wheels this makes rollerblades and skateboards legal on the sidewalk as well.
 
Have you ever seen, or heard of something called a "loading dock"?

No need to be deragatory. Deliveries in smaller packages come through the front door in most condos. The loading dock is specifically reserved for large deliveries.
 
Since the law is applied based on size of wheels this makes rollerblades and skateboards legal on the sidewalk as well.

Sure, as long as they have handlebars, pedals and brakes.

No need to be deragatory.

No need to be so sensitive.

Deliveries in smaller packages come through the front door in most condos. The loading dock is specifically reserved for large deliveries.

No, deliveries are made through the loading dock, not the front lobby.
See how I can make definitive statements with absolutely no citation...just like you?
 
Sure, as long as they have handlebars, pedals and brakes.
"A City bylaw allows cyclists with a tire size of 61cm or 24 inches or less to ride on the sidewalk. The intent of this bylaw is to allow young children to cycle on the sidewalk while they learn to ride. "

"The Toronto bylaw states that riding a bicycle with tire size over 61cm (24 inches) on sidewalks is prohibited, as is riding/operating a bicycle (or roller skates, in-line skates, skateboard, coaster, toy vehicle) on a sidewalk without due care and attention and reasonable consideration for others. "
 
So you can rollerblade on the street or the sidewalk. However, if you are on the street, it sounds like the same rules apply to cyclists. Need lighting and a bell?
You can ride on the sidewalk with your bike or rollerblades as long as you give care to pedestrians? It's all so confusing.
What really bugs me as a driver, is when I see people skateboarding on the street. I really don't think rollerblading should be allowed either though.
 
So you can rollerblade on the street or the sidewalk. However, if you are on the street, it sounds like the same rules apply to cyclists. Need lighting and a bell?
You can ride on the sidewalk with your bike or rollerblades as long as you give care to pedestrians? It's all so confusing.
What really bugs me as a driver, is when I see people skateboarding on the street. I really don't think rollerblading should be allowed either though.

It doesn't say anything about lighting and a bell, it just says keep right, stay in single line, that sorta thing. Only the last page apples to in-line skating or rollerblading, not the first 2. And on the sidewalk you have to be mindful of pedestrians.
 
I haven’t seen anyone on rollerblades in years. Isn’t that more of a 1990s or early 2000s thing?
I still see people rollerblading, though they're mostly relegated to indoor venues.

Scooters are much more popular among children than rollerblades these days.

There are even children's running shoes with wheels near the heels, most of which are made by Heelys. They are generically called "roller shoes."


There's even a section about injuries sustained by wearers.
 

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