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How to solve homeless issue?

Yeah, the ones who are afraid of shelters make sense.....the ones who moan about hotel stays don't.

I have a good friend who is a street nurse and she tells me about how some of the ones who get sent to hotels bitch about the free food and Starbucks coffees they get brought to their rooms.
Some also turn down hotel acommodation because of how tightly controlled the drug scene is and because they aren't allowed guests in their rooms.
It seems privilege comes in many forms. ;)

Even she (my nurse friend) has nothing nice to say about these particular homeless folk.


There are others who chose (yes, of their own volition) to camp out last summer and subsequently fell into the drug (mostly fentanyl) trap and are now stuck in a death spiral. I'm talking people in their 20s out of middle class homes.

Idiots.
 
Here's how not to solve homelessness: The City's new Report to next week's Economic and Community Ctte.

The into to the item is here: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2021.EC25.5

The Glossy Report, some 84 pages long, which cost $$$ to put together, and says remarkably little about its primary purpose is here: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2021/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-171730.pdf

This sort of thing makes my blood boil. (proverbially, of course) . Endless blather about everything except what needs doing. Lets examine this through a lens or seven, lets improve our data collection, lets study this, contemplate that
work towards something else and coordinate better while were at it.

Gah!

There are two core mandates: Provide people who need it, immediate shelter, in safe, dignified conditions. Find them permanent housing, appropriate to their needs and circumstances, ASAP.

What needs improvement is not a mystery, does not require further study or analysis, no re-inventing of the wheel is required.

This department directly controls shelters. For that part, they need to stop building people warehouses that aren't terribly functional, where residents routinely fear for their safety, where cleanliness/hygiene of the facility itself is suspect, where residents feel unwelcome and worry that their stuff will be stolen. They are really bad people warehouses.

The solution is already there in the RapidHousing/Modular Housing program.

Build S-R-O (single room occupancy) facilities where residents have their own private room, including small bathroom. Said room to have an electronic lock on the door, and be limited in access to the resident and to staff, the latter
under limited and compelling circumstances.

Reduce facility size to a maximum of 60. This reduces neighbourhood impact and objection, but also gives staff a chance to get to know residents by name and take greater interest in their welfare.

Lower the number of cases that each case manager/intake worker has to deal with so they can spend more time on actually addressing the needs of each client.

Nag other relevant divisions to do their job and build more permanent housing faster; and more long term care/institutional care for those who need that.

In the interim, place those who can manage on their own in private sector housing, if there is no non-profit/RGI option available.

***

Do not consider the equity of these moves, do not examine even one though a lens of any kind........just house people, that's all!
 
Build S-R-O (single room occupancy) facilities where residents have their own private room, including small bathroom. Said room to have an electronic lock on the door, and be limited in access to the resident and to staff, the latter
under limited and compelling circumstances.
Agreed, except for limiting access to the resident. You don't want this to be a detention centre or to assume that all homeless people are hopelessly incapable of managing themselves instead of just, you know, being poor.
 
Agreed, except for limiting access to the resident. You don't want this to be a detention centre or to assume that all homeless people are hopelessly incapable of managing themselves instead of just, you know, being poor.

If you meant the resident could have a guest, I'm fine w/that; I'm merely meaning that its private space.

If your meaning that staff ought not to have access; at all, ever, I don't think that's viable; you don't even enjoy that privilege where you live (nor do I); which is to say, a Landlord always has a right of entry in
an emergency; and under additional circumstances dictated by law, in the latter case, generally with 24-hour notice.

That's all I was allowing for; was that staff could enter if they had reasonable belief that the unit was being lit on fire, the plumbing had burst and was flooding the building or some other lawful justification for entry was on offer.
 
If you meant the resident could have a guest, I'm fine w/that; I'm merely meaning that its private space.

If your meaning that staff ought not to have access; at all, ever, I don't think that's viable; you don't even enjoy that privilege where you live (nor do I); which is to say, a Landlord always has a right of entry in
an emergency; and under additional circumstances dictated by law, in the latter case, generally with 24-hour notice.

That's all I was allowing for; was that staff could enter if they had reasonable belief that the unit was being lit on fire, the plumbing had burst and was flooding the building or some other lawful justification for entry was on offer.
Of course, I was merely suggesting that people housed this way should have the same rights as any tenant.
 
Of course, I was merely suggesting that people housed this way should have the same rights as any tenant.
And the same responsibilities. Surely illegal activity such as drug use would violate any lease?

If we want to solve Toronto's homeless situation we need to deal with the genesis of homelessness.
 
And the same responsibilities. Surely illegal activity such as drug use would violate any lease?

If we want to solve Toronto's homeless situation we need to deal with the genesis of homelessness.
High housing prices?
 
And the same responsibilities. Surely illegal activity such as drug use would violate any lease?

If we want to solve Toronto's homeless situation we need to deal with the genesis of homelessness.

Huh? Drug use is not grounds for eviction unto itself, anymore than consumption of alcohol.

The rules around evictions are quite clear, non-payment of rent, (if applicable)(including partial and late payments if persistent); wilful damage to property; unreasonable interference with the rights of other tenants. (exception, personal use by landlord, major renovation/demolition)

There isn't much else.

Specifically, this is addressed right on the Tribunal web page:

1634410339743.png


You will notice, simple possession/use is not listed.

That could still be a basis for eviction if the use unreasonably interfered with the rights of other tenants/safety etc.


Underlying Act:

https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/06r17/v18#BK70 See S.61
 
This from Chris Moise letter to his Ward:

January 2023 Allan Gardens Encampment Update

Over the holidays and throughout this month, I have been in contact with City Staff from the Shelter, Support, and Housing Administration Division and have continued to urge them to find permanent housing or create shelter spaces for those living in encampments in Allan Gardens. We find ourselves in the coldest time of the year, and I continue to prioritize outreach to unhoused individuals.

Since the start of my term, the number of encampments has been steadily decreasing. From a total of 39 tents and 30 individuals in the park to currently having 27 tents and 11 individuals. This is very encouraging and we continue to work hard to house people.

The majority of the individuals in Allan Gardens continue to collaborate with City Staff, and many have scheduled unit viewings and moved into permanent housing. There remain 5 individuals in Allan Gardens who have declined all available housing and shelter services. I understand that there is no one-size-fits-all solution for those experiencing homelessness. Still, I recognize that it is unsafe to stay outside in the cold. Residents in and around Allan Gardens have stated they are feeling increasingly unsafe with the number of encampment structures in Allan Gardens as they also exacerbate the pedestrian safety issues caused by the ongoing construction. In my last update, I stated that public parks cannot address the need for safe, indoor accommodations and I continue to stand by that statement. I hope that individuals who have declined all available services will work together with us toward an appropriate and reasonable solution.

I’d like to commend and thank City Staff for their hard work in outreach and securing housing for all individuals experiencing homelessness and hope that those unhoused will become responsive to their ongoing efforts.
 
The Star noting a recent Ontario Court decision that may well impact on removing encampments; though their headline mis-states the decision. The text of Keenan's piece is a bit better at expressing the details of the decision.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/sta...-says-ontario-court-is-toronto-listening.html (paywalled at time of posting)

From the above:

1675176527581.png


***

1675176640815.png


To Keenan/The Star's credit, the actual decision is linked in the article. (love that, 'show your evidence')

So here ya go:

 
The majority of the individuals in Allan Gardens continue to collaborate with City Staff, and many have scheduled unit viewings and moved into permanent housing.
That's good news.

There has to be something done to eliminate homelessness in a country as rich as Canada. According to the IMF, we have the eight highest GDP in the world. Fixes I could envision are as follows:

Constitutional amendment to make housing a right. The Charter has been amended at least twice since its enacting in 1982, most recently in 1993 concerning language rights in New Brunswick. If all Canadians and PRs can be guaranteed health care and education, why not housing?

While the above begins its decade(s) long grind through the amendment process, the Federal government should take the lead on getting the provinces to move on https://housingrights.ca/right-to-housing-legislation-in-canada/, with each province should be pushed, with federal funding as the carrot to ensure that everyone in Canada has permanent housing, including fully-staffed and equipped supportive housing for those with mental illness and addiction issues. That's what Japan does, where there are essentially 0% homeless.

And I don't mean a free condo for everyone, nor housing vouchers that landlords will exploit. No, the federal and provincial governments need to become landlords on a massive scale, the permanent housing (not temp shelter) of last resort for those who would otherwise end up on the street.
 
This from Chris Moise letter to his Ward:

January 2023 Allan Gardens Encampment Update

Over the holidays and throughout this month, I have been in contact with City Staff from the Shelter, Support, and Housing Administration Division and have continued to urge them to find permanent housing or create shelter spaces for those living in encampments in Allan Gardens. We find ourselves in the coldest time of the year, and I continue to prioritize outreach to unhoused individuals.

Since the start of my term, the number of encampments has been steadily decreasing. From a total of 39 tents and 30 individuals in the park to currently having 27 tents and 11 individuals. This is very encouraging and we continue to work hard to house people.

The majority of the individuals in Allan Gardens continue to collaborate with City Staff, and many have scheduled unit viewings and moved into permanent housing. There remain 5 individuals in Allan Gardens who have declined all available housing and shelter services. I understand that there is no one-size-fits-all solution for those experiencing homelessness. Still, I recognize that it is unsafe to stay outside in the cold. Residents in and around Allan Gardens have stated they are feeling increasingly unsafe with the number of encampment structures in Allan Gardens as they also exacerbate the pedestrian safety issues caused by the ongoing construction. In my last update, I stated that public parks cannot address the need for safe, indoor accommodations and I continue to stand by that statement. I hope that individuals who have declined all available services will work together with us toward an appropriate and reasonable solution.

I’d like to commend and thank City Staff for their hard work in outreach and securing housing for all individuals experiencing homelessness and hope that those unhoused will become responsive to their ongoing efforts.
certainly there are more individuals than 5, or even 11. We visited on the weekend ( confused the date of an upcoming plant sale) and there were many more tents than would serve as shelter for 11 individuals. Very sad state that the city doesn't seem to be addressing
 
That's good news.

There has to be something done to eliminate homelessness in a country as rich as Canada. According to the IMF, we have the eight highest GDP in the world. Fixes I could envision are as follows:

Constitutional amendment to make housing a right. The Charter has been amended at least twice since its enacting in 1982, most recently in 1993 concerning language rights in New Brunswick. If all Canadians and PRs can be guaranteed health care and education, why not housing?

While the above begins its decade(s) long grind through the amendment process, the Federal government should take the lead on getting the provinces to move on https://housingrights.ca/right-to-housing-legislation-in-canada/, with each province should be pushed, with federal funding as the carrot to ensure that everyone in Canada has permanent housing, including fully-staffed and equipped supportive housing for those with mental illness and addiction issues. That's what Japan does, where there are essentially 0% homeless.

And I don't mean a free condo for everyone, nor housing vouchers that landlords will exploit. No, the federal and provincial governments need to become landlords on a massive scale, the permanent housing (not temp shelter) of last resort for those who would otherwise end up on the street.
While this is a wonderful dream I think you ignore the problem that this would cost billions and we already have many people (including quite a few around here!) who think our taxes are already far too high. Amending the Charter in most cases requires virtual unanimity and achieving this seems extremely unlikely to me.
 

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