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PM Justin Trudeau's Canada

The inflation rate is 2.8%, lower then the US 3.2%.

And? Americans actually have higher wages and lower cost of living in absolute terms to make up for that 0.4% difference in the inflation rate.

Are you a bot or are you getting paid to blast out random stats on here without actual context or knowledge? Blasting out random stats on Urban Toronto isn't going to be changing votes. You're just trolling at this point. If you're an LPC campaigner let your boss know random stats aren't going to convince voters. They need to actually improve living conditions and quality of life for the median voter to get re-elected.
 
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Part of improving quality of life is actually implementing their climate plan. They have 80 billion dollars budgeted over ten years that should be helping to grow our economy.
They need to have a sense of urgency in implementing their clean investment tax credits. It is a major part of rebuilding our economy and creating good paying jobs.

As for polls? The Liberals were leading in the polls in June 2023, then the Bank of Canada started hiking interest rates again, and all the rats started to coming out.

The Liberals need to focus on the economy, and a major part of that is implementing their clean investment tax credits.
 
And? Americans actually have higher wages and lower cost of living in absolute terms to make up for that 0.4% difference in the inflation rate.

Are you a bot or are you getting paid to blast out random stats on here without actual context or knowledge? Blasting out random stats on Urban Toronto isn't going to be changing votes. You're just trolling at this point. If you're an LPC campaigner let your boss know random stats aren't going to convince voters. They need to actually improve living conditions and quality of life for the median voter to get re-elected.
I recently spent a week in Texas. I was assessing cost of living and pay in the area. Groceries were about the same. Some things more expensive than Canada, others cheaper. Lots of 'help wanted' signs, advertising low pay ($11/hour at a dairy queen). Home prices are much lower than here (<300k USD), but I get the sense that this area was not very economically active. The built form is a bit odd: Wide lots, single story ranches, often no gutters. No tax base to support road maintenance so the roads are terrible. Pickup trucks and full-size SUVs everywhere.
 
People intuitively understand something is wrong. And stats back them up.

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I recently spent a week in Texas. I was assessing cost of living and pay in the area. Groceries were about the same. Some things more expensive than Canada, others cheaper. Lots of 'help wanted' signs, advertising low pay ($11/hour at a dairy queen). Home prices are much lower than here (<300k USD), but I get the sense that this area was not very economically active. The built form is a bit odd: Wide lots, single story ranches, often no gutters. No tax base to support road maintenance so the roads are terrible. Pickup trucks and full-size SUVs everywhere.

Where'd you go? Cause I have relatives who live in an HOA in Houston whose multi-million dollar home is literally the smallest (you read that right) that the HOA allowed in the entire neighborhood. Their home is over 3000 sqft with a separate 3 car garage, saltwater pool, built on a one acre lot. The roads inside their neighbourhood are pristine. There's much more variation in the US than here. And especially in a state like Texas.

One thing that is different (and one has to watch out for) in low tax states like Texas are the property taxes. That $300k home probably pays $5k or more in taxes. Their property tax rates are much higher there.

As for their roads being terrible. Such is life in a place where the suburban ponzi scheme is further along. Add in the penchant for large vehicles and it only makes it worse. But at least in rural Texas that are more dirt roads. That's actually was more tax and infrastructure efficient.

End of the day, the fact that you (a successful middle class professional) are kicking the tires on a screwball (politically and culturally) state like Texas, says a lot about the current state of Canada.
 
End of the day, the fact that you (a successful middle class professional) are kicking the tires on a screwball (politically and culturally) state like Texas, says a lot about the current state of Canada.
It was an impromptu vacation. I would not consider living there, but I was curious about the much ballyhooed better quality of life in Texas. Maybe Austin could tempt me, but that's not where I was (closer to Dallas). The people are friendly, but the preponderance of gated communities, megachurches, giant vehicles did not make me gravitate to the area. One interesting thing was seeing the kids get out of school. The youth were overwhelmingly hispanic. I guess that is the future of Texas.
 
I recently spent a week in Texas. I was assessing cost of living and pay in the area. Groceries were about the same. Some things more expensive than Canada, others cheaper. Lots of 'help wanted' signs, advertising low pay ($11/hour at a dairy queen). Home prices are much lower than here (<300k USD), but I get the sense that this area was not very economically active. The built form is a bit odd: Wide lots, single story ranches, often no gutters. No tax base to support road maintenance so the roads are terrible. Pickup trucks and full-size SUVs everywhere.
and that's before you go bankrupt for a medical emergency.
 
and that's before you go bankrupt for a medical emergency.
Weird how so many people still move to the US despite this apparent risk. It's almost like the middle and professional class in the US are protected against this outcome but some kind of plan that covers for such risks.
 
Weird how so many people still move to the US despite this apparent risk. It's almost like the middle and professional class in the US are protected against this outcome but some kind of plan that covers for such risks.
Weird, it's almost as if people are really bad at risk assessment and don't realize that over half of all bankruptcies in the US are for medical bills, most of which are from middle class american families that had coverage.
 
The US did a good job the inflation reductions act and it is Canada's job to keep up. It is not all peaches and cream in the US. Look at New York City, if you want to see a city of contrasts visit New York City, I have family there so I should know.
You have places overrun by gang violence and extreme poverty, then up the street you have the land of the billionaires.

I am not here to kiss the governments ass. I have been very critical of the government not implementing their clean investment tax credits, because I know that this will grow our economy.
The clean tech industry is a trillion dollar industry, and we must not be left behind, our future depends on implementing these clean investment tax credits.
 
Weird, it's almost as if people are really bad at risk assessment and don't realize that over half of all bankruptcies in the US are for medical bills, most of which are from middle class american families that had coverage.

Weird. It's almost like you don't understand statistics and why people don't see that as a huge risk. Half of bankruptcies being medical doesn't mean that half of all people who move to the US, or even half of all people in the US end their life bankrupt. Go ahead, calculate the actual probability of an individual experiencing bankruptcy in the US and then adjust for income level (just Canadian immigrants to the US have higher than average wages).
 
Weird how so many people still move to the US despite this apparent risk. It's almost like the middle and professional class in the US are protected against this outcome but some kind of plan that covers for such risks.
I think private insurance is a false comfort. Lots of horror stories of people who supposedly had insurance being left with large medical bills because they had to go out of plan/network, or went over their maximums.
 
I think private insurance is a false comfort. Lots of horror stories of people who supposedly had insurance being left with large medical bills because they had to go out of plan/network, or went over their maximums.

Quantify "lots".

On balance a middle class professional moving to the US has a much higher chance of leaving behind generational wealth than they do in Canada right now.

I don't think this was necessarily the case for Boomers or even Gen X in Canada. There was a certain trade off. Lower material wealth in Canada for substantially better public services and security. These days you get some horrendous wait times and you might be locked out of the housing market forever, which also happens to be the primary wealth creation and preservation mechanism in Canada. But if you're not inheriting half a million from your parents in Canada, you and your kids are basically hooped in Canada. Might as well take your skills and go to a market where you have a better shot.

Does that mean everything is 100% better in the US? Definitely not. I've lived there. I'm well aware of the advantages and pitfalls. I also know that it's always Canadians who have never actually lived in the US talking about healthcare costs and usually as some kind of defensive response to any other economic comparison. There's a reason so many of our most talented leave. Or are we to believe that all these smart people are just statistically ignorant morons who don't understand the risks they are taking?

Are we going to be saying, "But healthcare...." right as we get doctor and nursing shortages like the 90s? Or we going to have start making tech undergraduates sign contracts like the tech CEOs keep demanding because they don't want to compete with American salaries?
 

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