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Toronto Crosstown LRT | ?m | ?s | Metrolinx | Arcadis

Here's Part 1 of Cedarvale station on May 31, 2021:

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They could take lemons and make Lemon Aid and make this system as fast as a Metro but only if they give the trains 100% signal priority. There is absolutely NO reason why these trains should be stopping anywhere along the route to wait for any lights. Rail crossing guards and car U-turns would solve these problems and put the "rapid" back into this supposed rapid transit line and ditto for Finch.

This is where we will really find out if the City TRULY wants Toronto to become a transit city or one with transit as long as it doesn't effect the cars. Hopeful for the prior but it will almost certainly be the latter. Due to this, I think the ML is going to have to admit that they blew this line big time and automate the Pearson to DVP section and then run the at-grade portion as 2 different lines requiring a linear transfer.
 
Honestly, I’m just waiting for the line to be built and in operation to see which one of the posters here will be right about the line: whether it’s going to be constantly delayed, mired in accidents - or whether it’ll operate just fine, have decent TSP and have better-than-expected ridership :)

Let me be clear: I don’t know. At this point I want to see it operational (even if it’s a staggered start).
 
This is faster than what you were expecting? I was expecting it to be even faster than this. Acceleration appeared sluggish for what I can only assume are testing-released reasons.

Yes this absolutely isnt the real service speed of the line. Just testing it out.
 
So long as it doesn’t stop at red lights at intersections that aren’t stops, including red lights at intersections that are stops where the platform is on the other side of the intersection.
 
So long as it doesn’t stop at red lights at intersections that aren’t stops, including red lights at intersections that are stops where the platform is on the other side of the intersection.

It will though, Transit Priority was mostly denied by the Toronto transportation commission (aka the car lovers). They are giving the trains a couple more seconds of green as they approach lights, but thats it.
 
Hard to believe they're going to run trains that long on the street!
That's only a three car train. If a train is disabled for some reason, it would need to be pushed by an other train all the way to the MSF at Mt. Dennis. Meaning, a possible six car train. They'll need to test out that possible scenario, just in case. They'll have to test out the limit of the number of cars, one car can push or pull over some distance.
 
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So long as it doesn’t stop at red lights at intersections that aren’t stops, including red lights at intersections that are stops where the platform is on the other side of the intersection.
I think they will, unfortunately.. There are too many small intersections that allow left turn (such as Swift Dr., Sloane Ave, Eglinton Square, and Pharmacy Ave around Victoria Park intersection; some of them only 200m apart. from each other), so I think it is almost impossible to synchronize all traffic lights to allow a good throughput frequency. If they had eliminated all these secondary street crossing and left only the main intersections to cross the line, then traffic lights could probably manage a good frequency of trains. They might opt to use the Crosstown as a "two-tier" system: the fast right-of-way part, (Keel to Laird, turning back some trains at Laird), and the slow part (Laird to Kennedy).
 
It may be inevitable to split the line between the off the road sections and the road sections, unless they short turn more train sets in the underground section or something
 
It will though, Transit Priority was mostly denied by the Toronto transportation commission (aka the car lovers). They are giving the trains a couple more seconds of green as they approach lights, but thats it.
This is because "transit priority" is management/politician dream compromise but an engineering nightmare. Train signaling on its own is hard - see basically every new transit line anywhere at the start, adding in this type of constraint just makes it worse (i.e., money and testing on signaling is never budgeted for correctly and making that part of the problem harder is just asking for trouble). And it inherently requires compromise between trains, vehicles, and what you all seem to forget, PEDESTRIANS, which is totally unneeded. We need to stop trying to play a zero sum game between modes of transportation when we don't have too, and this line is a crazy example of this.
 
This is because "transit priority" is management/politician dream compromise but an engineering nightmare. Train signaling on its own is hard - see basically every new transit line anywhere at the start, adding in this type of constraint just makes it worse (i.e., money and testing on signaling is never budgeted for correctly and making that part of the problem harder is just asking for trouble). And it inherently requires compromise between trains, vehicles, and what you all seem to forget, PEDESTRIANS, which is totally unneeded. We need to stop trying to play a zero sum game between modes of transportation when we don't have too, and this line is a crazy example of this.

Hmm. When I rode the LRTs in Denver, Baltimore and San Diego they had literal gates that came down and stopped cars like a railroad. The trains never stopped, the gates came down and all car traffic stopped.

Seems pretty easy to me from what ive experienced in the US of A
 

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