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The current and future BOOM(s) outside the downtown core

3Dementia

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I thought this future snapshot of “outside the downtown core” development might be useful, particularly for some new forum members.

This snapshot was originally posted in response to a SkyScraperPage thread question: “Why Does Toronto Have *So Many* Proposed Buildings?” FYI, the SSP forum content is overwhelmingly U.S. - centric despite its Canadian roots (ssp content often seems like 40% NYC + 50% rest of the USA + 10% rest of the world lol). If Toronto is ever annexed by the U.S., the odds of a reply to this snapshot at SSP would move from zero to 91.45% ;).

Outside of the huge boom in the downtown core:

1. EAST HARBOUR
Located on a 60-acre site east of Toronto’s downtown core, Cadillac Fairview's East Harbour is one of the largest commercial projects currently planned in Canada. Once complete, this 12-million square foot, mix of office, retail, and institutional developments will eventually employ 50,000 to 70,000 workers and a new transit hub.

2. HUMBER BAY VILLAGE

Just behind Humber Bay’s “little Miami” skyline, 15 buildings (16 - 70 storeys) are planned by First Capital for the former Chrisitie Bakery lands.

3. EGLINTON CROSSTOWN COMMUNITY

East of the growing Yonge/Eglinton mid-town skyline, the Eglinton Crosstown Community (in sales) would eventually see up to up to 20 towers and 3 dozen other buildings on 60 acres - including 5000 residential units, millions of square feet of office space, 120,000 square feet of retail space and a 6-acre public park.

4. ETOBICOKE CITY CENTRE

West of Humber Bay and surrounding the new Civic Centre now underway (designed by Henning Larsen), there are about 16 towers under construction and proposed by developers like Pinnacle and Concert, and a new master plan will see more to come.

5. SCARBOROUGH CITY CENTRE - Oxford masterplan

The (controversial) plans for the subway extension to the city centre has developers like Oxford Properties “thinking big” for the future, which would see more than 36 towers ranging in height from 20 to 65 storeys (the tallest buffering Hwy 401), as well as medium-rise, new street grids, parks and open spaces.

6. Scarborough's huge Golden Mile Plaza Redevelopment plan approved by local councillors:

This plan would add 45,000 residents, 19,000 jobs, 64 tall buildings, a new road network and parks over the next 2 decades.

Much more is happening in suburban cities like Vaughn, Markham etc., however this is the largest transformation:

7. MISSISSAUGA CITY CENTRE

In addition to multi-tower projects already underway like Roger’s M City and Camrost-Felcorp’s Exchange District, the largest mixed-use development in Canadian history is underway - Oxford’s 'Square One District' with an eventual 37 towers and 18 million sq feet will transform the shopping mall area into Mississauga’s downtown with commercial and residential towers, retail, parks and public art.

Note: Oxford is one of the lead developers of NYC’s massive Hudson Yards development.
 
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I thought this future snapshot of “outside the downtown core” development might be useful, particularly for some new forum members.

This snapshot was originally posted in response to a SkyScraperPage thread question: “Why Does Toronto Have *So Many* Proposed Buildings?” FYI, the SSP forum content is overwhelmingly U.S. - centric despite its Canadian roots (ssp content often seems like 40% NYC + 50% rest of the USA + 10% rest of the world lol). If Toronto is ever annexed by the U.S., the odds of a reply to this snapshot at SSP would move from zero to 91.45% ;).

Outside of the huge boom in the downtown core:

1. EAST HARBOUR
Located on a 60-acre site east of Toronto’s downtown core, Cadillac Fairview's East Harbour is one of the largest commercial projects currently planned in Canada. Once complete, this 12-million square foot, mix of office, retail, and institutional developments will eventually employ 50,000 to 70,000 workers and a new transit hub.

2. HUMBER BAY VILLAGE

Just behind Humber Bay’s “little Miami” skyline, 15 buildings (16 - 70 storeys) are planned by First Capital for the former Chrisitie Bakery lands.

3. EGLINTON CROSSTOWN COMMUNITY

East of the growing Yonge/Eglinton mid-town skyline, the Eglinton Crosstown Community (in sales) would eventually see up to 60 towers including 5000 residential units, millions of square feet of office space, 120,000 square feet of retail space and a 6-acre public park.

4. ETOBICOKE CITY CENTRE

West of Humber Bay and surrounding the new Civic Centre now underway (designed by Henning Larsen), there are about 16 towers under construction and proposed by developers like Pinnacle and Concert, and a new master plan will see more to come.

5. SCARBOROUGH CITY CENTRE - Oxford masterplan

The (controversial) plans for the subway extension to the city centre has developers like Oxford Properties “thinking big” for the future, which would see more than 36 towers ranging in height from 20 to 65 storeys (the tallest buffering Hwy 401), as well as medium-rise, new street grids, parks and open spaces.

6. Scarborough's huge Golden Mile Plaza Redevelopment plan approved by local councillors:

This plan would add 45,000 residents, 19,000 jobs, 64 tall buildings, a new road network and parks over the next 2 decades.

Much more is happening in suburban cities like Vaughn, Markham etc., however this is the largest transformation:

7. MISSISSAUGA CITY CENTRE

In addition to multi-tower projects already underway like Roger’s M City and Camrost-Felcorp’s Exchange District, the largest mixed-use development in Canadian history is underway - Oxford’s 'Square One District' with an eventual 37 towers and 18 million sq feet will transform the shopping mall area into Mississauga’s downtown with commercial and residential towers, retail, parks and public art.

Note: Oxford is one of the lead developers of NYC’s massive Hudson Yards development.

I saw that post over @SSP. Was then, and still is a good illustration of the Toronto development boom(s).
 
I wonder what people’s take is on these developments? While decentralization is desirable not least from an affordability perspective (by far the primary concern for most people I would think) I think in large part these are ill conceived developments. They are generally dense and yet highly auto dependent with poor access to services and amenities both public and commercial.
 
It's missing the construction boom at Vaughan Metropolitan Centre.

^ See above - "Much more is happening in suburban cities like Vaughn, Markham etc., however this is the largest transformation:" .. re: Mississauga ;)
 
3. EGLINTON CROSSTOWN COMMUNITY

East of the growing Yonge/Eglinton mid-town skyline, the Eglinton Crosstown Community (in sales) would eventually see up to 60 towers including 5000 residential units, millions of square feet of office space, 120,000 square feet of retail space and a 6-acre public park.

Would that be for the entire area? Or did you mean 6 towers?
 
Would that be for the entire area? Or did you mean 6 towers?
Good catch thx. I had meant to say 60 buildings (on 60 acres)... will edit to say "up to 20 towers and 3 dozen other buildings on 60 acres".
 
I wonder what people’s take is on these developments? While decentralization is desirable not least from an affordability perspective (by far the primary concern for most people I would think) I think in large part these are ill conceived developments. They are generally dense and yet highly auto dependent with poor access to services and amenities both public and commercial.

A few thoughts...

EAST HARBOUR - it's envisioned around a commuter/transit Hub
Nearby, now and in the future: thousands of residences to the west (East Don Lands), south (*Portlands) and north (established/growing)... plus despite the city's "commercial-only" rhetoric, I personally believe when built out there will be some residential here. There already are other uses planned to animate the site incl. retail, restaurants, cultural, entertainment, parks/public spaces.

*While much of the Portlands will be mid-rise residential (flight path issues etc.), the northern portion of the site (across the canal near the Gardiner) is rendered with tall massing which will likely yield a very large residential community... almost next door to East Harbour.

HUMBER BAY VILLAGE
First Capital envisions a TTC hub and access to GO. Lots of retail/parks/restaurants etc.

EGLINTON CROSSTOWN COMMUNITY
More suburban than Yonge/Eglinton of course but served by the Eglinton Crosstown LRT (plus aforementioned 120,000 square feet of retail, office, 6-acre public park and access to all the valley trails).

ETOBICOKE CITY CENTRE
Future mini-transit/GO station hub?

SCARBOROUGH CITY CENTRE - Oxford masterplan
Proposed station at Scarborough Centre conencted to GO and proposed Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit, local TTC bus connections.

Scarborough's Golden Mile Plaza
Mixed uses and served by Eglinton Crosstown LRT.

MISSISSAUGA CITY CENTRE
Every type of residential/commercial/leisure/public space use and served by Metrolix Hurontario LRT (2024 completion?)
 
Great thread thesis. When I began noticing how many development booms were taking place outside of the downtown core, I decided to make the thread Toronto's Other Skylines to document the change as before we know it, these areas will be developed.

I honestly don't even think we're scratching the surface. There are areas that are about to boom and it is going to shock a lot of people. Downtown Pickering, Midtown Oakville, and the Dixie GO areas spring to mind as places that aren't even on the radar like Square One, Golden Mile, STC, and Vaughan Metropolitan Centre are.

edit: I just read that thread on SSP - wow a lot of people hate Toronto over there, and can't seem to understand the market fundamentals, demographics, and institutional + private capital at play here. Every other comment seems to contain some veiled belief that either people don't live in the condos being built, or that Toronto can't possibly have so much office demand (despite sub-3% vacancies and a ton of inventory being built). Don't want to make the discussion into a negative tone though - I simply think they are wrong, the past two decades of development are testament to them being wrong, and everything being planned and proposed in our city seems to indicate a future pattern of those Toronto skeptics still being wrong. :)
 
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Great thread thesis. When I began noticing how many development booms were taking place outside of the downtown core, I decided to make the thread Toronto's Other Skylines to document the change as before we know it, these areas will be developed.

I honestly don't even think we're scratching the surface. There are areas that are about to boom and it is going to shock a lot of people. Downtown Pickering, Midtown Oakville, and the Dixie GO areas spring to mind as places that aren't even on the radar like Square One, Golden Mile, STC, and Vaughan Metropolitan Centre are.

edit: I just read that thread on SSP - wow a lot of people hate Toronto over there, and can't seem to understand the market fundamentals, demographics, and institutional + private capital at play here. Every other comment seems to contain some veiled belief that either people don't live in the condos being built, or that Toronto can't possibly have so much office demand (despite sub-3% vacancies and a ton of inventory being built). Don't want to make the discussion into a negative tone though - I simply think they are wrong, the past two decades of development are testament to them being wrong, and everything being planned and proposed in our city seems to indicate a future pattern of those Toronto skeptics still being wrong. :)

The very clear SSP anti-Toronto bias notwithstanding

And while when it comes to office development, I've seen no evidence of large chunks sitting vacant.

There is some of that in residential as @MetroMan has detailed in the very development in which he lives; which is clearly very well located and attractive.

I think the SSP types overstate the issue at large; but it there is some truth in there.
 
3D I think we'll get there in terms of connecting some of these nodes but Toronto is characterized by a very tortuous route to the obvious.

I think the best example characterizing how planning works in this City region with respect to nodes is Mississauga City Centre. Mississauga City Centre development and development ambition is one of the largest nodes in the City-region. This yet there is no direct transit connection between downtown Toronto and Mississauga. Even when built a Cookstown GO transit node to LRT transfer is kind of tortuous underkill.

Mississauga is Canada's 6th biggest Municipality. It's bigger than Winnipeg. It's bigger than Vancouver! In any other major world city there would be a priority rapid transit build connecting Mississauga City Centre, Downtown Toronto, and Pearson Airport in a triangle.
 
3D I think we'll get there in terms of connecting some of these nodes but Toronto is characterized by a very tortuous route to the obvious.

I think the best example characterizing how planning works in this City region with respect to nodes is Mississauga City Centre. Mississauga City Centre development and development ambition is one of the largest nodes in the City-region. This yet there is no direct transit connection between downtown Toronto and Mississauga. Even when built a Cookstown GO transit node to LRT transfer is kind of tortuous underkill.

Mississauga is Canada's 6th biggest Municipality. It's bigger than Winnipeg. It's bigger than Vancouver! In any other major world city there would be a priority rapid transit build connecting Mississauga City Centre, Downtown Toronto, and Pearson Airport in a triangle.

It really is bizarre not only that no direct link exists, but that there isn't even one on the books. Didn't help that "The Eternal Mayor", Hazel McCallion, actively worked against it for all those decades she ruled her fiefdom with an iron fist.
 
I thought this future snapshot of “outside the downtown core” development might be useful, particularly for some new forum members.

This snapshot was originally posted in response to a SkyScraperPage thread question: “Why Does Toronto Have *So Many* Proposed Buildings?” FYI, the SSP forum content is overwhelmingly U.S. - centric despite its Canadian roots (ssp content often seems like 40% NYC + 50% rest of the USA + 10% rest of the world lol). If Toronto is ever annexed by the U.S., the odds of a reply to this snapshot at SSP would move from zero to 91.45% ;).

Outside of the huge boom in the downtown core:

1. EAST HARBOUR
Located on a 60-acre site east of Toronto’s downtown core, Cadillac Fairview's East Harbour is one of the largest commercial projects currently planned in Canada. Once complete, this 12-million square foot, mix of office, retail, and institutional developments will eventually employ 50,000 to 70,000 workers and a new transit hub.

2. HUMBER BAY VILLAGE

Just behind Humber Bay’s “little Miami” skyline, 15 buildings (16 - 70 storeys) are planned by First Capital for the former Chrisitie Bakery lands.

3. EGLINTON CROSSTOWN COMMUNITY

East of the growing Yonge/Eglinton mid-town skyline, the Eglinton Crosstown Community (in sales) would eventually see up to up to 20 towers and 3 dozen other buildings on 60 acres - including 5000 residential units, millions of square feet of office space, 120,000 square feet of retail space and a 6-acre public park.

4. ETOBICOKE CITY CENTRE

West of Humber Bay and surrounding the new Civic Centre now underway (designed by Henning Larsen), there are about 16 towers under construction and proposed by developers like Pinnacle and Concert, and a new master plan will see more to come.

5. SCARBOROUGH CITY CENTRE - Oxford masterplan

The (controversial) plans for the subway extension to the city centre has developers like Oxford Properties “thinking big” for the future, which would see more than 36 towers ranging in height from 20 to 65 storeys (the tallest buffering Hwy 401), as well as medium-rise, new street grids, parks and open spaces.

6. Scarborough's huge Golden Mile Plaza Redevelopment plan approved by local councillors:

This plan would add 45,000 residents, 19,000 jobs, 64 tall buildings, a new road network and parks over the next 2 decades.

Much more is happening in suburban cities like Vaughn, Markham etc., however this is the largest transformation:

7. MISSISSAUGA CITY CENTRE

In addition to multi-tower projects already underway like Roger’s M City and Camrost-Felcorp’s Exchange District, the largest mixed-use development in Canadian history is underway - Oxford’s 'Square One District' with an eventual 37 towers and 18 million sq feet will transform the shopping mall area into Mississauga’s downtown with commercial and residential towers, retail, parks and public art.

Note: Oxford is one of the lead developers of NYC’s massive Hudson Yards development.

I wonder the validity in including Scarborough City Centre. It wouldn't surprise me if it never happened, similar to the Yorkdale Masterplan (~1500 units?). It would be great if both happened but especially with the wrench COVID has thrown in, it wouldn't surprise me if the first shovel in the ground doesn't happen until 203X if ever.

There are a few more Toronto plans that could be included (I'm sure I've missed a bunch):
-Lawrence heights with around 4000 new units
-I don't remember the name of the area, the area to the north of Sherway Gardens has a master plan in development including a number of towers.
-Galleria mall ~3000 units
-Cloverdale mall ~10 towers
 
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3D I think we'll get there in terms of connecting some of these nodes but Toronto is characterized by a very tortuous route to the obvious. Mississauga City Centre development and development ambition is one of the largest nodes in the City-region. This yet there is no direct transit connection between downtown Toronto and Mississauga. Even when built a Cookstown GO transit node to LRT transfer is kind of tortuous underkill.

Maybe a GoFundMe website for a (no chance for Alberta) hyper-loop? Oxford pays 25%.

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Canadian Press
 

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