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Ottawa Transit Developments

That would be a very sad state of affairs if that were true. Considering the TTC is absolutely abysmal at line management themselves.
They are bad with the surface routes but a lot of that has more to do with traffic. I think it was people from the subway system that came to help plus to look it over to see what to do and not to do with Eglinton.
 
They are bad with the surface routes but a lot of that has more to do with traffic. I think it was people from the subway system that came to help plus to look it over to see what to do and not to do with Eglinton.
That's what they want you to believe, but in most instances that is simply not the case
 
I mean, you could hypothetically do it on a technical basis, but it would likely be extremely expensive. You'd have to either retrofit parts of Belfast yard (and potentially the new Moodie yard) for the alternate train type, and train people on how to maintain/repair a different train. While it may seem obvious that you could just use one train type at each yard, the Moodie yard has already been spec'd for the Alstom trains and trying to change that mid-construction would also be expensive. It's not as simple as just plugging in a different train type. Plus the costs of procuring more trains when Ottawa has already bought a whole fleet of Alstom trains (and cancelling the contract for the ones under construction is also likely to be financially unfeasible)

Also as one of the replies notes, the S70 is only 70% low-floor, vs the Citadis being 100% low floor, which is the reason Citadis trains were proposed by Alstom (as part of RTG) in the first place.
 
I mean, you could hypothetically do it on a technical basis, but it would likely be extremely expensive. You'd have to either retrofit parts of Belfast yard (and potentially the new Moodie yard) for the alternate train type, and train people on how to maintain/repair a different train. While it may seem obvious that you could just use one train type at each yard, the Moodie yard has already been spec'd for the Alstom trains and trying to change that mid-construction would also be expensive. It's not as simple as just plugging in a different train type. Plus the costs of procuring more trains when Ottawa has already bought a whole fleet of Alstom trains (and cancelling the contract for the ones under construction is also likely to be financially unfeasible)

Also as one of the replies notes, the S70 is only 70% low-floor, vs the Citadis being 100% low floor, which is the reason Citadis trains were proposed by Alstom (as part of RTG) in the first place.
It might not be the equipment that is the problem, it could be the way the cars are maintained and how the track infrastructure is inspected.

Maybe they didn't torque the bots to the correct measurement. Maybe the sandbox was installed incorrectly. Maybe the track was slightly out of alignment.

That's not a design flaw, that's a management and maintenance issue.

The bearings may have been an issue but that can happen with any type of rolling stock. LRC had cracked axles, is that to say they are a bad design?

These cars are used in other parts of the world with a good track record. Maybe not from this manufacturing facility but if the facility is the problem, then the people inspecting the manufacturing process are at fault.

So buying or leasing new rolling stock may not solve the issue.

Bombardier had their fair share of delivery issues but other than faulty welds there have been no major accidents or derailments. So as far as I'm concerned they have a better track record.
 
It might not be the equipment that is the problem, it could be the way the cars are maintained and how the track infrastructure is inspected.

Maybe they didn't torque the bots to the correct measurement. Maybe the sandbox was installed incorrectly. Maybe the track was slightly out of alignment.

That's not a design flaw, that's a management and maintenance issue.

The bearings may have been an issue but that can happen with any type of rolling stock. LRC had cracked axles, is that to say they are a bad design?

These cars are used in other parts of the world with a good track record. Maybe not from this manufacturing facility but if the facility is the problem, then the people inspecting the manufacturing process are at fault.

So buying or leasing new rolling stock may not solve the issue.

Bombardier had their fair share of delivery issues but other than faulty welds there have been no major accidents or derailments. So as far as I'm concerned they have a better track record.

IF it is maintenance, it could still be design. Maintenance procedures and instructions are actually part of the design, but are often skipped/done poorly to save cost (and the Ottawa LRT was very tight fisted with the money, which can be another issue in not having enough spares/extra trains etc) and then result in operational difficulties. Also, how easy it is and the frequency/need to perform maintenance is also part of design and could be off. Things like this are rarely as simple as one party being the sole cause.
 
Article in today's Star about Ottawa's troubled LRT.

I remember criticism about the TTC and Metrolinx getting Bombardier's Outlooks and Freedoms cars.
 

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