News   Jul 19, 2024
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Danforth Line 2 Scarborough Subway Extension

It looks like the busway is at risk, or at least delayed. The executive committee isn't feeling the love.

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And to my previous point, are they going to bother for marginal benefits for only a couple years?

Might as well start planning and design for the future (post-subway completion) use (I presume a trail connecting to the elevated park).
 
It's funny to hear about the Kennedy nightmare of a 3-level change, which was going to be reduced to 1, while they have set about building a 7-level interchange at Osgoode, where travellers will go up past the University line and back down again.
 
SRT route between Ellesmere station and Kennedy station needs to be paved over into a busway. Unfortunately SRT elevated sections, ramps, tunnels and stations can’t be utilized. Busses can loop in front of stations and then enter back onto Busway. Exiting busway just north of Kennedy station and pull into station like other busses.

Ellesmere and Borough dr should also be given a dedicated bus lane.

The entire SRT route can eventually be converted into bike and walking path once subway completed. Existing SRT stations at Kennedy and STC can even be utilized for bike lockers
Reposting my comments from two years ago.

We need to look at this project as a two phase approach. 60 million doesn’t have to be spent right now on this project. Concrete barriers like the ones used for the York University busway will not be community/bike friendly once busway is no longer needed. Concrete barriers will also require drainage. Busses don’t need street lighting in this corridor. Remove exiting rail infrastructure, widen where needed, pave over, introduce new access driveways in front of Ellesmere, Lawrence station and Kennedy station. We can continue to use theses stations as shelters. This project can be built a lot quicker and cheaper.
 
It's funny to hear about the Kennedy nightmare of a 3-level change, which was going to be reduced to 1, while they have set about building a 7-level interchange at Osgoode, where travellers will go up past the University line and back down again.
They aren't going to be happy when they find out how far they are going to have to walk (both up and over) from the new Scarborough Centre station to the mall. And at Lawrence East, it's so deep, that it's faster to walk from the current Ellesmere station platform to the Ellesmere bus!
 
I wouldn't dismiss the busway just on the ground that it is a temporary solution.

Besides making the riders happier, it can save on the bus operating costs. Faster trips means fewer buses and fewer bus drivers are needed to provide the same level of service, without any loss in capacity or frequency.

The proponents claim the bus way will save 10 min each way. Maybe that's overestimated in comparison with dedicated on-street bus lanes. Let's assume that the saving is just 5 min each way, i.e. 10 min for the round trip.

Let's assume our bus route one-way trip takes 35 min without the busway; that's a 70 min roundtrip. To maintain a 3-min frequency, one needs 24 buses on the route.

Cut the roundtrip to 60 min, and now we only need 20 buses. And this is not a service cut, as we still maintain the same 3-min frequency, and the same capacity (20 bus trips per hour per direction, times the capacity of one bus). This is a true efficiency.

It is worth calculating the combined cost of saving on multiple bus routes between STC and Kennedy, and compare that sum to the cost of busway. Quite possibly, the saving will outweight the construction cost.
 
It's funny to hear about the Kennedy nightmare of a 3-level change, which was going to be reduced to 1, while they have set about building a 7-level interchange at Osgoode, where travellers will go up past the University line and back down again.

This was one of the key arguments for the SSE (on the forum) - the injustice of a transfer, having to move up and down different levels. It's a fact of life people who use the subway/transit in the city.

I can't believe how poorly planned this all has been. It's like the SSE had a certain political utility but there wasn't much thought put into the actual experience of riders...

Having a busway ready, at the very least, should've been a no-brainer before decommissioning the SRT.
 
This was one of the key arguments for the SSE (on the forum) - the injustice of a transfer, having to move up and down different levels. It's a fact of life people who use the subway/transit in the city.

I can't believe how poorly planned this all has been. It's like the SSE had a certain political utility but there wasn't much thought put into the actual experience of riders...

Having a busway ready, at the very least, should've been a no-brainer before decommissioning the SRT.
You know, if the SSE started construction when it was supposed to (a decade ago), it could've been up and running by now.

Also, how do you suppose we build a busway whilst the RT is still in the ROW taking up space? Delete the Stouffville Line?
 
You know, if the SSE started construction when it was supposed to (a decade ago), it could've been up and running by now.

Also, how do you suppose we build a busway whilst the RT is still in the ROW taking up space? Delete the Stouffville Line?

Obviously not, but it should be designed and shovel ready for the day the RT closes. How is designing a two-lane road in a straight line where a flat rail bed sits going to take another year, as media reported? I hate to chime in with the "In China..." trope, but it's probably literally true that in Beijing it would be a three-month design-build-cut the ribbon job. Without any workers dying.
 
You know, if the SSE started construction when it was supposed to (a decade ago), it could've been up and running by now.

Also, how do you suppose we build a busway whilst the RT is still in the ROW taking up space? Delete the Stouffville Line?
And if the SRT conversion to LRT took place, riders would be riding the LRT since 2015 as well traveling to Malvern which the SSE will never do.
 
Given how well the Eglinton LRT is going, would we be so confident about that? ;)
I've been saying this for a while. What makes people so confident any of the Transit City lines would have been done on time? Maybe a few years ago one could have claimed so; but not since Eglinton slipped and slipped and slipped.
 

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